Georgia, Armenia Discuss Transport Cooperation

Armenian Minister of Transport and Communications Gagik Beglaryan met on Tuesday the Georgian Prime Minister, Giorgi Kvirikashvili (Photo: Gov.ge)
Armenian Minister of Transport and Communications Gagik Beglaryan met on Tuesday the Georgian Prime Minister, Giorgi Kvirikashvili (Photo: Gov.ge)

Armenian Minister of Transport and Communications Gagik Beglaryan met on Tuesday the Georgian Prime Minister, Giorgi Kvirikashvili (Photo: Gov.ge)

TBILISI (ArmRadio)—Georgia and Armenia are jointly looking at ways to better harmonize the international transit corridor through Georgia – the E60 Highway – to ensure swift, efficient transporting of goods via European standard rods, Agenda.ge reports.

Georgia’s Prime Minister, Giorgi Kvirikashvili, met on Tuesday Armenia’s Minister of Transport and Communication, Gagik Beglaryan, in Georgia’s capital Tbilisi.

The two officials spoke about moving cargo through Georgia as a transit corridor and along its main highway. While transit traffic currently used this route, both officials agreed more could be done to improve the local infrastructure and develop the country’s transit potential.

Kvirikashvili and Beglaryan noted the importance of the E60 Highway, which spans the width of the country, from east and west. The road connects Black Sea coastal Batumi and Poti to Tbilisi in the east, and continues on to the Tsiteli Khidi (Red Bridge) border checkpoint between Georgia and Azerbaijan.

The highway is regarded as part of a corridor that connects Europe in the West and Asia in the East via a network of international standard roads.

The two officials also spoke about several other main roads in Georgia that connect the country with neighboring nations, such as the Mtskheta-Stepantsminda-Larsi road that heads up from Tbilisi towards Russia and the Tbilisi-Bakurtsikhe-Lagodekhi road that goes east.

Kvirikashvili and Beglaryan agreed that the most efficient way to transit cargoes from Armenia through Georgia is via Rustavi and on to Sadakhlo, and from Tbilisi to Geguti.

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