‘Stick to Education’ Seeks to Create an Armenian Humanitarian Youth Movement

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Davidian with the students from the school in the Arajamough village in Artsakh

Davidian with the students from the school in the Arajamough village in Artsakh

BY DERRICK DAVIDIAN

Monday, August 7, 2017 marked the birth of Stick to Education, better known as Stickinn’Ed, that would affect over a 100 kids , in Armenia, Artsakh, and the Diaspora.

My name is Derrick Davidian. I was born on September 6, 2001, and since birth have been affected by international misfortunes, which is a pivotal drive for my life asspirations: to help the international community and promote humanitarian aid. Ranging from the tragedy in New York, 5 days after my birth, and the Armenian Genocide 86 years prior to my birth, both historical catastrophes are events that, I believe, have shaped me into an individual who wants to promote and do good for the international community.

Stick to Education is a non-profit organization, which is established to aid schools in need of educational resources, such as: books, pens, pencils, and backpacks. Our first project, which took place in the Arajamugh village, located in the Hardut region, Artsakh, was a success.

Derrick Davidian, who is a junior at the AGBU Manoogian-Demirdjian School, conceived of the idea of Stickinn’Ed

Derrick Davidian, who is a junior at the AGBU Manoogian-Demirdjian School, conceived of the idea of Stickinn’Ed

The collection of the donations and funds for the backpacks and pens took 10 months to finish. I enhanced my communication skills and how to communicate with others, be it from across the world with Medina (Stepanakert Tufenkian Foundation staff member) or the local t-shirt printer. I also learned how pivotal organization and management is to any project.

I bought and sold 50 t-shirts, bought 100 backpacks and 200 pens, transported them from Los Angeles to Artsakh, and safely handed, one by one, to the students of the village. The excitement, joy, and appreciation I saw on the students’ faces made me feel out of this world. The simplicity of school supplies bringing such emotion to compel these students not only motivated me to do more, but has also sparked a feeling of camaraderie with my brothers and sisters in my homeland. The diaspora cares and wants to connect with them.

One of my favorite moments was having the honor of listing to some of the students recite poems, and sing songs that I have also been taught, but in Los Angeles. We are more similar than we might think. The smiles and joy on my brothers and sisters faces in Artsakh was worth it.

Stickinn’Ed is a way that I give back to my homeland and my brothers and sisters. You can have more simple ideas that can be executed easier, but still have an impact. This all started with me wanting to make a change and difference, and now I have an organization with one year under its belt. I challenge all of you to find new ways of benefiting others and giving back to your community, and making a change.

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