City of Boston and ATP Unite to Plant New Trees in Dorchester Park

Left to right: Boston City Councilor Frank Baker, Armenia Tree Project Founder Carolyn Mugar, Armenia Tree Project Executive Director Jeanmarie Papelian, Dorchester Park Association Board Members David Mareira, Lisa Ahern, and Middlesex County Sheriff Peter Koutoujian plant a Cherry Tree in Boston’s Dorchester Park
Left to right: Boston City Councilor Frank Baker, Armenia Tree Project Founder Carolyn Mugar, Armenia Tree Project Executive Director Jeanmarie Papelian, Dorchester Park Association Board Members David Mareira, Lisa Ahern, and Middlesex County Sheriff Peter Koutoujian plant a Cherry Tree in Boston’s Dorchester Park

Left to right: Boston City Councilor Frank Baker, Armenia Tree Project Founder Carolyn Mugar, Armenia Tree Project Executive Director Jeanmarie Papelian, Dorchester Park Association Board Members David Mareira, Lisa Ahern, and Middlesex County Sheriff Peter Koutoujian plant a Cherry Tree in Boston’s Dorchester Park

BOSTON, Mass.— Armenia Tree Project proudly brought its tree-planting mission to Boston’s Dorchester Park, where seven new trees have taken root. As of Wednesday, May 15, three cherry trees and four white oak trees will thrive in the park, which was designed by famed American landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead.

The Boston’s Parks and Recreation Department, ATP, and Dorchester Park Association were represented at yesterday’s tree planting, which featured spoken remarks, shiny shovels, and the watering of a new cherry tree. The event reflects ATP’s commitment to tree populations worldwide, and Greater Boston’s Armenian population—one of the world’s largest.

“Today’s planting helps Armenia Tree Project offer its appreciation to the people of Greater Boston, and to show our gratitude, we are doing what we do best, planting trees, right here in Dorchester,” said Carolyn Mugar, founder of Armenia Tree Project.We are here because we want to thank Boston for being there for Armenians in their times of need; First, as a refuge for those fleeing genocidal mayhem of the early 1900s and, since then, for being home to generations of Armenian-Americans. Twenty-five years ago, not long after our devastating earthquake and our newly established freedom from the Soviet Union, folks all around Boston helped us launch a new vision, the Armenia Tree Project. We are here today to show our gratitude. Thank you.”

In addition to the trees, a friend of Armenia Tree Project contributed $2,000 to support the ongoing welfare of the park. In planting and restoring more than 5.7 million trees since 1994, Armenia Tree Project has fostered economic and social development through creating jobs and improving the tree population.

“We are thrilled to partner with Armenia Tree Project to plant additional trees and keep the park beautiful,” said Frank Baker, Boston City Councilor. I hope to keep this partnership going with Armenia Tree Project, not only in Lower Mills but throughout Dorchester. Their contribution helps us to keep Frederick Law Olmstead’s vision for Dorchester Park alive.”

Today’s tree planting is one of several events ATP has planned to celebrate its 25th anniversary. In October, ATP will host an inaugural conference in Yerevan for local, regional, and global leaders in forest restoration. Forest Summit: Global Action and Armenia, will take place at American University of Armenia’s Acopian Center for the Environment from October 20 – 23.

“The Armenia Tree Project’s mission blends beautifully as an opportunity to teach about today’s need for green solutions to climate change and urban development,” said Lisa Ahern, a board member with Dorchester Park Association. “Dorchester Park Association is excited to be able to work with Armenia Tree Project, Boston Parks and Recreation, and all of our committed elected officials to teach local children, and the community in general, the many benefits of protecting precious green space in an urban setting.”

About Armenia Tree Project:

Armenia Tree Project, a non-profit program based in Woburn and Yerevan, conducts vitally important environmental projects in Armenia’s cities and villages and seeks support in advancing its reforestation mission. Since 1994, ATP has made enormous strides in combating desertification in the biologically diverse but threatened Caucasus region. More than 5,700,000 trees have been planted and restored, and hundreds of jobs have been created for Armenians in seasonal tree-related programs.

ATP works to further Armenia’s economic and social development by mobilizing resources to fund reforestation. These vital new trees provide food, wood, environmental benefits, and opportunities for economic growth. ATP has a full time staff of over 80 in Armenia. The Yerevan office manages four state-of-the-art tree nurseries and two environmental education centers, partners with villagers to create tree-based micro-enterprise opportunities, creates urban green belts for public use, restores degraded forest lands, and employs hundreds of part-time workers to plant new forests. ATP is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization in the United States with its own advisory board and registered as a project of the Armenian Assembly of America, Inc.

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